300 Foot Stone Circle With Interior Burial Mounds Reported at the Newark Ohio, Earthworks

300 Foot Stone Circle With Interior Burial Mounds Reported at the Newark Ohio, Earthworks



North of the Newark, Ohio henge was discovered a large 300 foot cobblestone circle that surrounded large burial mounds. It's closest counterpart is the Mayburgh Henge In England,that was also constructed from thousands of river cobble stones.

      A curious group of mounds that attracted the attention and wonder of the pioneers, were         unfortunately destroyed by the building of the Central Ohio railroad. They were not far from the Old Fort, and stood just at the foot of Cherry valley, and a little east of the Ohio canal, where the above mentioned railroad crosses it. Three of these mounds stood in a line north and south; the fourth was a little east and between the two northern ones. They were all joined together at the base. In the destruction of this remarkable group of mounds, many interesting relics and facts were unearthed that appear worth preservation. The mound farthest south was included in the embankment of the Central Ohio railroad, and was first destroyed. The other three were greatly injured by the earth being taken to make the railroad embankment. The northern mound was the largest, and was about twenty feet high. This was finally leveled to form a site for a rolling mill. The upper eight feet of this mound was composed almost entirely of black loam, which appeared in layers. 
      A hole near the center was observed to continue down very near to the bottom of the mound. In some places this was filled with sand, differing from the earth around it. In the lower eight feet of the mound quite a number of these perpendicular holes were observed. About one half of the lower portion of the mound was made of layers of blue clay; then there was a layer of sand, followed by- one of cobble stone, which appeard to be immediately over a strong burning. This layer of stone was about five feet from the base. In the middle mound the layer of cobble stone was about eight feet from the base, was in the center of the mound, sixteen inches thick, and extended all over it, thinning out toward the edges. The cobble stone, in all places, seemed to be put on immediately over the burning, none of the stones having the marks of fire, except those coming in contact with the burnt earth. The heat of the fire must have been intense, for the small stones in places were quite friable, and in places strongly marked with oxide of iron. This iron appearance led many to think that iron tools might have been placed there and rusted out.
    In the fourth mound the cobble stones were placed over burnings and on a level with the surrounding surface, and covered with creek sand. The blue clay in the northern mound must have been brought from a distance, there being none near like it. About three feet below the surrounding surface of the earth, and near the bottom of the large mound, the workmen, in digging the pit for the fly wheel, found several pieces of bones and a part of the lower jaw of a human being with one tooth yet remaining in it All the bones gave evidence of great age, and were in small pieces. The cobble stone layers in these mounds and the post holes are unusual features. Could the latter have been for a frame work, from which to suspend victims for sacrifice? 
   Surrounding this entire group of mounds was a cobble stone way, about eight feet wide. This is yet plainly to be seen north of the railroad, but the remainder has been destroyed. This oblong circle of stone must have been one hundred yards in its north and south diameter, and sixty-six yards east and west. Within sight of this gronp of mounds were originally about one dozen. Many of these have been destroyed. The digging of the pit for the fly-wheel revealed, the lower portion of this mound, better than examination heretofore made, and showed plainly that human beings had been buried at least four feet beneath the surrounding surface of the earth. During the excavating process the place was visited by many citizens, and gentlemen from a distance, and much interest taken. The greater portion of these mounds being composed of sand and loam may account for the paucity of bones found in them. The best preserved skeletons are found where the ground is mostly clay.